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Baseball Injury Prevention and Performance

According to the US Consumer Product Safety Commission more than 627,000 baseball injuries are treated in hospitals, doctor’s offices, clinics, ambulatory surgery centers, and emergency rooms each year. The key to preventing these injuries lies in preseason screening for players of all ages. Potential risks for injury that can be identified with a preseason screening include asthma, allergies, heart conditions, and orthopedic conditions like muscles weakness or poor flexibility. It is also important for players to warm up properly prior to play. Low intensity exercises like running drills and stretching can help players prepare for a game and avoid injury.

Other ways to avoid injury include

  • Pitchers are highly susceptible to shoulder injuries. Therefore, on days when they are not pitching, pitchers should avoid the positions of catcher and outfielder because these playters are also prone to shoulder injuries. The best position for pitchers to play when they are not on the mound is first base, because infield positions carry less risk of shoulder injury.
  • Always use proper equipment including helmets with face shields, mouth guards and eye protection particularly for pitchers, infielders and batters at the high school level.
  • If a player sustains an injury it is important to rest to avoid making the condition worse. For an athlete rest means stopping participation in the sport for a period of time to allow the pain to subside and the player’s strength to return
  • Following an injury, initiating physical therapy can help a baseball player return to their previous level of function. A physical therapist will develop a plan of care for each individual patient’s specific injuries. A combination of manual therapy and exercise can be extremely beneficial for baseball players.