default header

Hockey Injury Risk Factors

There are intrinsic and extrinsic risk factors for injury. Intrinsic factors are a child’s individual musculoskeletal issues, which can include skeletal immaturity (bones and joints that are still developing) or muscle weakness. Extrinsic factors are the environment in which an athlete performs, which can include the level of competition: how much, how hard and how long play lasts.

Other common risk factors for hockey injuries include

  • Concussion can occur as a result of traumatic impact of the player’s head either with the ice, the boards, the stick, or another player.
  • The most common shoulder injury in hockey is a shoulder separation or clavicle fracture occurring from direct contact.
  • A fall on an outstretched wrist that forces the wrist back can result in a wrist fracture.
  • Hip flexor and groin injuries can be related to the stride of the skater.
  • The medial collateral ligament (MCL) is the most vulnerable to injury due to the position of the knee when hockey players push off during skating.