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Football Injury Risk Factors

There are intrinsic and extrinsic risk factors for injury. Intrinsic factors are a child’s individual musculoskeletal issues, which can include skeletal immaturity (bones and joints that are still developing) or muscle weakness. Extrinsic factors are the environment in which an athlete performs, which can include the level of competition: how much, how hard and how long play lasts.

Other common risk factors for football injuries include:

  • Muscle strains that occur when a player has not properly warmed up prior to a practice or game.
  • Prolonged intense activity also puts muscles and tendons at risk of injury.
  • After having a strain the athlete must rehabilitate completely to decrease the risk of re-injury.
  • Muscles most commonly involved in strains are the hamstring, quadriceps (thigh muscles), and gastrocnemius (calf muscle).